espumaqantica said: Thanks for the include!

Of course! That’s one of my all time favourite SF fits.

25 Mar 2014 / 1 note

mostlyharmlessstuff said: Man tackar!!

Väl bekomme!

25 Mar 2014 / 2 notes

jacketandtie said: I didn’t realize MrChris, Shen, and Sansimeon were also Scandinavian. Basically America got it’s ass whooped by Sweden and friends. Has that happened in any other realm before?

Hardly, hahaha. We need to savour this moment.

25 Mar 2014 / 1 note

Styleforum Friday Challenge - Americans vs. the rest of the world

Last weeks Friday challenge on Styleforum was a team based challenge: “FURRINERS V MURICANS BEST OF THE BEST A-GAME ONLY”.

This meant that each poster could chose an outfit he was particularly satisfied with and enter it into the challenge. The Americans put up a great fight, but the “furriners” took home the victory. I have picked out a few outfits that I found particularly appealing from the winning team:

Pingson - A man who is incredibly consistent in finding great combinations of colours/patterns (and impeccable fit). A forum favourite, unsurprisingly.

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Butler - Refined taste and flair, most of the time in lovely suits and jackets from Steven Hitchcock. Never boring.

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Anden - Great poster who is definitely one of my favourites, mainly because he is not afraid of trying out new interesting combinations.

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TTO - Oh come on tumblr, you already know Theo. Very personal style, which no one could do better.

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Timotune - A man who has found a winning concept in colours and fit, and sticks to it. With subtle improvements all the time, he is now one of the most consistently great posters.

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Betelgeuse - I honestly don’t know that much about this poster, but this fit pretty much speaks for itself, flawless.

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Me - yep, I am that smug.

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Holdfast - While I don’t always agree with his tie choices, this is just brilliant.

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RogerP - Again, a poster I don’t know that much about, but that suit & those shoes are just stellar.

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tchoy - A bespoke customer who really knows what he likes. He has got an incredibly inspiring tumblr, unfortunately I cant remember the url right now.

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sansimeon - Another poster I don’t know anything about (other than the fact that he´s a fellow Scandinavian, perhaps Swede). This fit is just great though.

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MrChris - A fellow Swede I think. Obviously a fan of quality suits and shoes. I almost didn’t pick this one out because of the terrible angle, but changed my mind as you can still see it’s a very nice outfit.

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Shen - Another Scandinavian who I don’t know that much about. This is classic stuff done good though.

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Most posters were in fact great, but I excluded some due to too much cropping, bad angles and/or picture quality.

See all participants (including the “Murricans”) here.

Sunday stroll with the dogs. Wearing casual stuff, like a tweed sport coat with patch pockets, jeans, OCBD shirt, wool tie & suede chukkas.

Another picture of this outfit I wore the other day. I don’t think I’ve ever discussed the thought process behind any of my outfits. Most of the time though, there are some general rules that guide me when getting dressed. The level of formality that garments hold are important, it’s almost as important as colour combination and interplay between textures and fabrics. In fact, these three aspects very much depend on each other: Formality, colours & textures/material.
I won’t go to deep into this subject right now, but at least I can use this as a backdrop to explain the outfit pictured above:
1. I wear a cashmere sport coat. It’s semi-informal - as it’s brown, has a window pane check (yes, some formal suits have a window pane check, but they’re never brown) and has patch pockets.
2. I wear a pale blue Oxford cotton shirt. Pale blue is a great go-to colour for shirts, since it works with most outfits. Oxford is a quite informal fabric. This shirt does however, have a spread collar. Spread collars are generally quite formal. Therefore you could make the point that also the shirt is semi-informal (some people argue the point that spread collars on Oxford cloth shirts are bastardizations though, I don’t agree).
3. I wear a silk bow tie in a blue and green pattern. The blue works well with both the main brown colour of the sport coat and reflects the subtle blue lines within the window pane pattern. The kind of bottle green that makes up the pattern of the bow tie looks great with the chocolate brown of the sport coat, since they are both within the same spectrum of classically autumnal colours. Bow ties are classically deemed just as formal as ties, but due to their stance as somewhat eccentric and due to pattern/colour mix it works within this rather informal setting.
4. I wear a cream coloured silk pocket square. It’s a low-contrast mix with the sport coat, which is a good thing. Some people argue that white pocket squares goes with anything, but they do make a stark contrast to almost anything you might wear. White is classically seen as the most formal colour of pocket ornamentations, especially when the pocket square is made of linen. A cream coloured silk pocket square folded in Foo’s bend-it-over-fold will work with lots of different getups within the less formal spectrum of menswear.
5. I paired this with mid grey flannel pants, as formal as odd pants go, but still odd pants. Grey flannel is incredibly easy to match with most jacketing and is highly recommended to any man with a desire to have a versatile wardrobe staple.
6. As can be seen in the earlier post I went with quite unconventional footwear. This was mostly because I wanted to try out my new shoes. I changed to a pair of mid brown suede shoes with rubber soles before heading out, both because of the horrible slush outside, and because it was a better match with this particular outfit. In shoes, suede is less formal than calf skin and brown is less formal than black (quite simplified). A blue shoe is an odd bird that I wouldn’t recommend you to buy, until you’ve got your shoe wardrobe staples.

Another picture of this outfit I wore the other day. I don’t think I’ve ever discussed the thought process behind any of my outfits. Most of the time though, there are some general rules that guide me when getting dressed. The level of formality that garments hold are important, it’s almost as important as colour combination and interplay between textures and fabrics. In fact, these three aspects very much depend on each other: Formality, colours & textures/material.

I won’t go to deep into this subject right now, but at least I can use this as a backdrop to explain the outfit pictured above:

1. I wear a cashmere sport coat. It’s semi-informal - as it’s brown, has a window pane check (yes, some formal suits have a window pane check, but they’re never brown) and has patch pockets.

2. I wear a pale blue Oxford cotton shirt. Pale blue is a great go-to colour for shirts, since it works with most outfits. Oxford is a quite informal fabric. This shirt does however, have a spread collar. Spread collars are generally quite formal. Therefore you could make the point that also the shirt is semi-informal (some people argue the point that spread collars on Oxford cloth shirts are bastardizations though, I don’t agree).

3. I wear a silk bow tie in a blue and green pattern. The blue works well with both the main brown colour of the sport coat and reflects the subtle blue lines within the window pane pattern. The kind of bottle green that makes up the pattern of the bow tie looks great with the chocolate brown of the sport coat, since they are both within the same spectrum of classically autumnal colours. Bow ties are classically deemed just as formal as ties, but due to their stance as somewhat eccentric and due to pattern/colour mix it works within this rather informal setting.

4. I wear a cream coloured silk pocket square. It’s a low-contrast mix with the sport coat, which is a good thing. Some people argue that white pocket squares goes with anything, but they do make a stark contrast to almost anything you might wear. White is classically seen as the most formal colour of pocket ornamentations, especially when the pocket square is made of linen. A cream coloured silk pocket square folded in Foo’s bend-it-over-fold will work with lots of different getups within the less formal spectrum of menswear.

5. I paired this with mid grey flannel pants, as formal as odd pants go, but still odd pants. Grey flannel is incredibly easy to match with most jacketing and is highly recommended to any man with a desire to have a versatile wardrobe staple.

6. As can be seen in the earlier post I went with quite unconventional footwear. This was mostly because I wanted to try out my new shoes. I changed to a pair of mid brown suede shoes with rubber soles before heading out, both because of the horrible slush outside, and because it was a better match with this particular outfit. In shoes, suede is less formal than calf skin and brown is less formal than black (quite simplified). A blue shoe is an odd bird that I wouldn’t recommend you to buy, until you’ve got your shoe wardrobe staples.

Summer is just around the bend

Jacket - LBM 1911 
Linen shirt - Kamakura 
Jeans - Our Legacy 
Loafers - Saint Crispin’s
Knitted silk tie - Drakes
Pocket Square- Berg & Berg

Summer is just around the bend

Jacket - LBM 1911 

Linen shirt - Kamakura

Jeans - Our Legacy

Loafers - Saint Crispin’s

Knitted silk tie - Drakes

Pocket Square- Berg & Berg

So, we received a bunch of these jackets, along with pants, vests and coats. I know summer is just around the bend, but A/W 14-15 is going to be awesome! Follow E-F-V here on Instagram for pics, contests and what not: @efvclothing

So, we received a bunch of these jackets, along with pants, vests and coats. I know summer is just around the bend, but A/W 14-15 is going to be awesome! Follow E-F-V here on Instagram for pics, contests and what not: @efvclothing

21 Mar 2014 / 15 notes

Blue suede shoes.

paul-lux:

MTM Profilo Italiano Narin Couture bespoke Incotex Meermin Drakes

This is a good example of the fact that 9/10 times, less is actually more.

paul-lux:

MTM Profilo Italiano
Narin Couture bespoke
Incotex
Meermin
Drakes

This is a good example of the fact that 9/10 times, less is actually more.

20 Mar 2014 / Reblogged from paul-lux with 127 notes